Recent Entries

  • Grind Culture in Science is a Lie

    When we think of the hard-working scientist, we think about a scientist that enters that lab early in the morning. They work through the day using multiple cups of coffee to keep their energy up. Late at night, they can be seen writing on a whiteboard, making the prime discoveries in their field.Sci...
  • Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 Vaccine: How Does It Work?

    Operation Warp Speed, launched in early 2020, helped speed up the pace of vaccine innovation, turning the normally 10+ year clinical trials process into one that takes less than a year. To learn more about the vaccine development process, check out this post by Nidhi.Although vaccine developmen...
  • Not quite sure how solar cells work? Think of them as pizza.

      Yes, there are more similarities between solar cells and pizza than you might think. I'm a solar energy researcher working towards eliminating the defects in and improving the performance of industrial solar cells. A PhD is a long journey full of untimely experiments and countless sleep...
  • Bad Advice.

    If I had to go back in time and give myself advice, I’d tell myself to be cautious of advice. Advice isn’t necessarily good or bad, but it’s often misguided or the wrong fit. In your scientific career, especially early on, it’s tempting to trust all the guidance tossed your w...
  • From Academia to Entrepreneurship

    Entrepreneurship offers a unique opportunity to continue exploring and researching while learning new skills and tackling challenges that will dramatically enhance your career. However, it is paramount to recognize the stark differences between life in academia vs. life as an entrepreneur. Here are ...
  • Does having a female mentor affect success of mentees?

      A wave of controversy and outrage followed the recent publication of a study by AlShebi et al. from the New York University of Abu Dhabi on November 17th. In their Nature Communications paper, the authors analyzed 3 million mentor–protégé pai...
  • The Power of Good Mentorship

    “What made you want to be a Scientist?”This question always takes me aback. I have been in science so long it’s hard to pinpoint that exact moment where I went from not-a-scientist to the path I’m on now. I was always good at science… but that didn’t make me want...
  • Why is there no Cure for Cancer?

    In less than one-year, scientists created not one, not two, but three vaccines with over 90% efficacy for Covid-19. Which begs the question, what gives? Why don't we have cures for all our other ailments? After spending billions of dollars on cancer research for decades, where is that cure...
  • Channeling the characters of Schitt's Creek

    If the Rose Family of Schitt's creek can have their estate repossessed and forced to live in a motel within a one-horse town, you can survive any misfortune your research career throws your way. Rough patches are a given in research. Grant rejections, failed experiments, and criticisms; oh my! So, h...
  • Lessons from training for marathons during my PhD: I can do an

    You learn a lot about yourself in graduate school. The same is true while running a marathon. Signing up for either is a great way to realize your masochistic tendencies. Jokes aside, continually working towards two immense challenges has taught me several valuable lessons that I share here. ...
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